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Since 2014, schools, museums, arts and community groups have been working together on creative projects to commemorate the First World War (FWW). 

We have worked with the First World War Centenary Partnership, led by IWM (Imperial War Museums) to design a special edition Arts Award to support accreditation of your projects.

 

 

Until the end of 2018 children and young people have the opportunity to achieve a First World War Special Edition Arts Award certificate if they have worked with creative projects to commemorate the First World War centenary for their Arts Award.

Advisers can request to receive Special Edition certificates when making a moderation booking for Explore through to Gold, or placing an order for Discover certificates. To find out more see these guidelines on booking FWW Special Edition moderations or ordering certificates.

 

First World War Case Studies

  • There are many ways in which young people can respond to the First World War to help them achieve the Special Edition Arts Award certificate. 
  • Young people from Great Yarmouth library researched how the FWW affacted their local area and used what they discovered to create films that have been shown across the county!
  • Students at Carre's Grammar School took inspiration from Paul Cummins' installation of cermaic poppies at the Tower of London, Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red, and Michael Morpurgo's The Butterfly Lion for their First World War Special Edition Arts Awards.
  • Gunnersbury Park Museum is a local history museum in Hounslow, London. The museum learning team ran a week long Arts Award Explore summer holiday project during which children found out about the First World War through objects in the collection and the wartime experiences of local resident Major Frederick Sadler.  You can read about the project in this case study.
  • Pupils from Brookfield Community Primary School visited Lancashire Infantry Museum and the Museum of Lancashire for a workshop that included discovering what life was like for conscripted soldiers going into the trenches. They used this as inspiration for creative work back at school for Arts Award Explore. Watch a film of their immersive First World War experience here.
  • At the British Postal Museum and Archive, students from Haverstock School in Camden wrote poems inspired by the First World War objects and stories in the BPMA collection. Find out more here.


Here are a some more ideas to get you started:

  • Use art work produced during the FWW, or in response to it, as the starting point for new work: paintings, songs, poems, novels, photographs, trench art, posters, postcards – and more.
  • Find out about the people involved in the war and their stories – this could be a family member, your local community or internationally well-known figures. Re-tell these stories in writing, performance, pictures – whatever art form works for you and the children and young people you are working with.
  • Take an object as the starting point: find out what kind of person would have worn a uniform, imagine the story of a piece of military equipment or flag, tell the story of a domestic object, like a sock, from being knitted at home to being worn at the front
Tameside Council and The Lowry, Salford, supported by Curious Minds in association with the National Theatre, have created a War Horse Arts Award Explore arts logs which can be used as part of FWW projects - find out more here.
If you would like advice on how your FWW project fits with Arts Award, get in touch at artsawardenquiries@trinitycollege.co.uk or call 020 7820 6178.